History Archive

Hundreds Of Ancient Egyptian Coffins To Be “Restored”

  Foreigners have a history of lightening the skin coulour depicted on ancient Egyptian artifacts.  Egypt will restore hundreds of coffins dating back thousands of years to the time of the pharaohs as part of an American-Egyptian project to preserve and document one of Read on » » »

Cameroon-Dr. J.N. Foncha’s Resignation Letter from the CPDM

John Ngu Foncha               Yaounde, 9th June 1990 Your Excellency, RESIGNATION FROM THE CPDM I have the honour to inform Your Excellency that after careful consideration and careful thought, I have decided to address to you my resignation Read on » » »

Cameroon: The Tombel Massacre of 1966

+The reasons for the massacre were complex.   According to Victor T. Levine’s, The Cameroon Federal Republic (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1971). Levine depicts the Tombel Massacre (pp. 155-157) On December 31, 1966, a mob of Bakossi in Tombel ran riot and slaughtered as Read on » » »

Cameroon -A must read:Moments in U.S. Diplomatic History

+Creating of Yaounde’s First Consulate. The first official U.S. diplomatic post in Cameroon was founded in 1957 during its waning days as a United Nations trust territory. The country was divided between the French and the British; both colonial powers had been preparing their Read on » » »

Ethiopian Judaism Identical To That Practiced By Ancient Jews?

  Ethiopian Jews are discriminated against in Israel. Dr. Yossi Ziv has been researching the religious rituals of the Ethiopian Jewish population still in Ethiopia and discovered that they maintained the same customs and traditions as the Jews of the Second Temple period for Read on » » »

Archaeologists Unearth Mummy in Egyptian Tomb Circa 1075 B.C.

Archaeologists Discover Millennia-Old Mummy in Egyptian Tomb   Spanish archaeologists have discovered a millennia-old mummy in “very good condition” near the southern Egyptian town of Luxor, the antiquities ministry said Sunday. The find was in a tomb likely dating from between 1075-664 B.C. on Read on » » »

USA:The Electoral College Has Its Origins In Slavery

Google This year, for the fourth time in history—and second time in recent history– a presidential candidate won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College and, therefore, lost the election.  Hillary Clinton received 200,000 more votes than Donald Trump nationwide, yet lost handily Read on » » »

8 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know About the Richest Man in History, Mansa Musa

Emperor Mansa Musa I, an African king from the late 13th century, is considered the richest person to ever live. He had an estimated net worth of $400 billion, well above Sam Walton, Warren Buffett and Bill Gates’ combined wealth.   Please follow and Read on » » »

America’s Private Prison Industry Was Born from the Exploitation of the Slave Trade

Private prisons — those for-profit correctional facilities owned by corporations rather than the government — have their origin in the slave trade. The Federal Bureau of Prisons recently decided to phase out its contracts with private prisons due to safety issues, as the Department Read on » » »

Germany Will Apologize For Their Other Genocide

  Germany will finally apologize for its other genocide. In a landmark admission of historical guilt, chancellor Angela Merkel said her country will formally recognize and apologize for the systematic murder of Namibia’s Herero people more than a century ago. Read the full story at: http://qz.com/733463/germany-finally-apologizes-for-its-other-genocide-more-than-a-century-later/ Please Read on » » »

Sunken Portuguese Slave Ship Relics to be Displayed at Smithsonian’s African-American History Museum

Some of the iron ballast bars that were shipped to the U.S. to be displayed at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Photo courtesy of the Washington Post As the Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture gears up Read on » » »

Cameroon’s lake Nyos features in 12 of the Worst Natural Disasters Ever (That You’ve Probably Never Heard Of)

  Which natural disaster is the worst of all? Events that stick in people’s minds are travesties such as the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and following tsunami, or further back in time the volcanic eruptions of Krakatoa and Mount Vesuvius. It turns out though, Read on » » »

World’s First Illustrated Christian Bible Discovered At Ethiopian Monastery

The Garima Gospels. The world’s earliest illustrated Christian book has been saved by a British charity which located it at a remote Ethiopian monastery. The incredible Garima Gospels are named after a monk who lived in the African country in the fifth century and Read on » » »

Ghana-Elmina Castle : The Oldest and Largest Slave Dungeon

Although many people think the Goree Island is the largest Slave dungeon in West Africa, the Elmina Castle is considered to be the oldest and largest in Ghana. The Elmina Slave Dungeon holds the most disturbing sites of the slave trade in Ghana. It Read on » » »

USA-Slave Descendant Shares Dinner with Plantation Owner in ‘Remarkable’ Meeting Praised by White Community: ‘Here’s a Guy Who Truly Gets it’

Nkrumah Steward Facebook While visiting South Carolina as a child, Nkrumah Steward – a Black man with a Black family who was born and raised in Michigan – always wondered why a white man would greet him and his family with a hug. The Read on » » »

Mother Of All Lootings: The Benin Bronzes

Most of Africa’s most precious artifacts were stolen by European thieves.  The British punitive expedition of 1897 goes down in history as one of the darkest episodes of Britain’s imperial past on the continent. It also unwittingly kick-started the european obsession with stealing African art Read on » » »

Violette N. Anderson: First Black Female Attorney to Practice Before U.S. Supreme Court

Violette Neatley Anderson became the first black female attorney admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court. Anderson was born on July 16, 1882, in London, England to Richard and Marie Neatley. The family later immigrated to the United States and settled in Chicago, Read on » » »

Juliet Miles: Died in Prison Trying to Save Her Children from Slavery

In 1851, Reverend John Gregg Fee, one of Kentucky’s most prominent abolitionists, purchased Juliet Miles, an enslaved woman from his father. His intentions of the purchase were to keep Miles from being sold. Fee demanded the immediate uncompensated freedom of the slaves, since he Read on » » »

National Museum of African American History Wants to Preserve Site of Tamir Rice Death

Cudell Recreational Center gazebo where 12-year-old Tamir Rice was shot. (Nick Castele/ideastream) The city of Cleveland will put a 30-day hold on demolition of the gazebo where Tamir Rice was shot to death, following a request by the Smithsonian Institution to preserve it. Tamir’s Read on » » »

Mifflin Gibbs: One of the First Appointed Black Judges in the United States

  Mifflin Gibbs was an entrepreneur, abolitionist, and lawyer who was involved in the abolitionist movement with Frederick Douglass in western New York. He later relocated to California, where racial prejudices kept him from working as a carpenter. Therefore, with the little money he Read on » » »